Sunday, 8 December 2013

Create the Success You Really Deserve...

Know your worth!

Have you ever went in for an interview, all enthusiastic, with a winning, beaming smile, standing up as straight as can be...only to realise (perhaps subconsciously) that your enthusiasm is superficial, your smile is not genuine, and in reality, you do not want this position at all.

Admittedly, it is something that has happened to,well, a large number of us. Applying for a high-earned position, one that can pave forward our career path (or at least that's what we hope)...going in for the interview, getting accepted...and perhaps ending up taking the position, in fear that there is nothing better for us or perhaps no more opportunities down the line.

Although it would be most wise to think about refusing an offer, learn how to say 'no'. But there’s good argument for turning down a new job: the role doesn’t meet your internal value, either in title, responsibility or compensation. Learn how to value yourself — and how to sell that value to hiring managers — and you’ll be able to leave the false enthusiasm, and frustrating positions, behind. 

Your value shouldn’t be defined by the buyer of your services; instead, it should be validated by the buyer. Your goal should be to present yourself as an undervalued asset that will flourish upon taking the next step.

So...play it smart!

Does this mean that you should never accept a position that’s a lower level or pay grade than what you think you deserve?

Absolutely not. The way you present yourself to the job market is through the narratives you can tell about who you are and what you have accomplished.

If you’re moving from a well-paid job with a good title to a lower-paid job with more responsibilities, the stories you’ll be able to tell about your impact will be greater.

If the role offers a larger opportunity for growth, your perceived setback may only be temporary.

Though many accepted lower pay, over two years, many former mid-level managers changed their LinkedIn profiles to include titles such as Director and VP.

As these companies grow, the role my former colleagues play in that growth is substantial and tangible. When they look for their next job, they have great stories to tell about their impact and abilities.

The value of anything is what the market is willing to pay. As the seller of your services, you owe it to yourself to find the right buyer who will meet you at your estimated worth.

We all know someone who left one company for another only to receive a substantial promotion in the process. But rather than see that move as the result of luck, we should consider how the individual presented herself as qualified for the newfound responsibilities.

Determining your own value can be hard, and there’s great opportunity to sabotage yourself through over- or under-confidence.


Article adapted from Brazen Life

Nikita Pisani at Muovo

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